Rescue Diver Miami

The PADI Rescue Diver program develops your knowledge and skills so you can effectively perform diver assists and rescues, manage diving accident situations and render first aid. The program is an important step in expanding your knowledge and experience as a diver. PADI Rescue Diver (or equivalent) certification in Miami is also a prerequisite for all PADI leadership programs.

What you will learn:

The PADI Rescue Diver course prepares you to deal with dive emergencies, minor and major, using a variety of techniques. Through knowledge development and rescue exercises, you learn what to look for and how to respond. During rescue scenarios, you put into practice your knowledge and skills. Topics include:
  • Self rescue
  • Recognizing and managing stress in other divers
  • Emergency management and equipment
  • Rescuing panicked divers
  • Rescuing unresponsive divers

You may be able to get college credit for the Rescue Diver course – ask your instructor.

What scuba gear will you use?

You’ll use your basic scuba equipment and will need a pocket mask to practice in-water resuscitation. During exercises, you’ll work with an oxygen unit, floats, marker buoys and perhaps CPR mannequins. Your PADI Instructor will explain the equipment that you need and may suggest additional gear, such as your own first aid kit, which will be useful throughout your diving career.
Check at Tarpoon Lagoon Dive Center in Miami to get advice about everything you need for your diving adventures.

Equipment needed:

Choosing and using your scuba gear is part of the fun of diving. In Tarpoon Lagoon Dive Center in Miami we will help you find the right gear. Each piece of scuba equipment has a different function so that together, it adapts you to the underwater world.

For Rescue Course as a minimum, you'll want your own:

These have a personal fit, and Tarpoon Lagoon we will help you choose gear with the best fit and features for you.
Consider investing in all your own scuba equipment when you start your course because:
  • You’re more comfortable learning to scuba dive using gear you’ve chosen.
  • You’re more comfortable using scuba gear fitted for you.
  • Scuba divers who own their scuba diving equipment find it more convenient to go diving.
  • Having your own scuba diving gear is part of the fun of diving.

The kind of gear you’ll need depends on the conditions where you dive most.

** 10% OFF for our students.

What to expect:

 Once you've checked in on the morning of class we will sit back in The Lagoon Lounge for a relaxing review of the materials you've completed, after that will build upon your experience in the beautiful Atlantic Ocean for your Certification dives.
Over 3 a day period we will cover the classroom review and exam for the Rescue Diver Course, Complete your Confined Water Sessions to build confidence in your ability to assist in a real life rescue. Finally we will evaluate your skill in Open Water Scenarios. The schedule is Semi-Custom and can be worked to fit your personal needs. If you are not already current in your First Aid and CPR Training, we are happy to provide that as well prior to your Rescue Diver Course. 

Personal items to bring:

  • Swimsuit
  • Towel
  • Sunscreen
  • Sandals
  • Change clothes
  • Lunch / Money

 

Everything you'll need is just once price!
Since your instructor will be diving with you for both assistance and safety, all you need to do is enjoy the dive and swim with the fish!

(305) 532-1445

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FAQ's

  • How long does a dive last? The answer is «it depends». This question  doesn’t have a single answer. People breathe at different rates and the deeper you go, the more you use your air. The average dive during a discovery lasts about 40 minutes.
  • Can I do only 2 dives? YES. If you choose to go for 2 dives, you’ll simply join our 3 dives trip. Spend your surface interval while snorkeling or sunbathing on the boat.
  • What do I need to bring with me on the excursion? A hat, sunglasses, sunscreen lotion, a towel. If you tend to get motion sickness it’s recommended that you take pills. Water is provided.
  • Is lunch included? YES. A local lunch prepared with fresh local ingredients is part of the day. You’ll get snacks  between the dives as well.
  • Can I eat just before a dive? Yes. Actually it is a good idea to eat light before a dive. It’s not really recommended to have a full heavy breakfast. A good one is enough!
  • Can I drink alcohol before diving? No. Alcohol isn’t recommended before dive.
  • How old do you have to be? 10 years old. A minor from 10 till 18 years old will need written consent from parent or guardian to dive with us.
  • Is scuba diving dangerous? Statistics show that recreational Scuba diving is about as safe as swimming.
  • I have done a discovery. Can I dive with qualified divers? No. You can’t dive with certified divers because you’re not qualified. You get a course and obtain your Open Water Diver level.
  • I wear my contact lenses under the mask? Yes Soft lenses can be worn, but we advise not to wear hard or medium hard lenses. Note that you can’t wear glasses under your mask.
  • Can my buddies join as passenger? Yes. You can dive and he/she can come on the boat. It’ll be a nice day as well. Our dive sites are also really enjoyable for snorkeling.
  • I have asthma. Is it possible to dive? If someone has sever chronicle Asthma and have to take different types of medicine to control, it’s highly recommended not to dive.
  • But for some one suffering from common asthma is able to dive.  It is recommended that they bring their medicine with them.
  • How soon can I fly after a dive? For safety reasons, allow 24 hours between your last dive and your flight.
  • I have a cold and a cough can I dive? If the sinuses are not blocked you can dive. If the sinuses are blocked than you will have a problem equalizing the pressure in your ears, than it is recommended not to dive.
  • I am pregnant, can I dive? No. Because physiologists know little about the effects of diving on the fetus, the recommendation is that women avoid diving while pregnant or trying to become pregnant.

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